You are faced with a situation with a high possibility of failure or bad things happen, your mind dwells on the potential disaster, but it does not stop there. The mind likes to think and imagine. It takes that disaster possibility as a FACT and further goes down the train of thought, ten steps forward along the line of that pitiful possibility. In the end, you laid out a series of possibilities of bad things that could happen, way beyond the current challenging situation you are facing. In this way, your mind magnifies the problem in the form of a worry.

What if you fail the driver’s test that’s coming up? If you fail you won’t be able to drive legally. Then what? Then life is a mess because you won’t be able to drive to see your special friend in another state. Then what? Then you two will not get into a romantic relationship. So on and on. The fact is, you haven’t taken the driver’s test yet, but the bad possibility and the subsequent potential happenings are already all laid out in the mind. Because you are experiencing that bad possibility and subsequent happenings vividly in your mind, you are a good match to that possibility happening, meaning you will actually attract the thing you worry about to happen. It was what happened to me years ago and indeed I failed the driver’s test, more than 5 times!

Being worry is a state of being, it puts you in the fear of things you don’t want to happen. And by doing so you miss out on good possibilities and draw that pitful outcome to reality. The law of attraction works perfectly whether or not you know it.

There are many occasions in life that we unconsciously dwell on the worrisome possible future. When you are in a worry you feel so justified to be so. You think you are thoughtful of considering not only the good but the bad that could happen. You think that you will be prepared when the bad things do happen. When it does happen you are happy that you “foresee” it coming.

However, what you were seeking to do is conscious thinking. There is a difference between conscious thinking and worry. Conscious thinking is being aware of all the possibilities that might happen but do not attach to a particular outcome, the mind likes the negatives, and entertain that train of thought by following it down multiple steps forward. Conscious thinking helps you make conscious decisions. You are fully aware of the possibilities that could happen and this in turn helps you make the best decision you know of. On the other hand, being worry brings a particular outcome, the potential disaster, into the focus of your attention and you live in this imaginary possibility. The tendency to worry is a state of mind that you have full control to change.

How you think is a habit of choosing your thoughts. Think about it, when you worry, you are choosing what you would like to think, the potential disaster that keeps your mind busy. Otherwise, how could you feel worried? Somewhere you made a decision, usually unconscious, about how you want to think. And you like how the mind races and chases the other possibilities that’s an outgrowth of your initial worry. Since it’s a thinking habit you can certainly change it to a healthy mental habit.

Throughout the day mentally ask yourself how you are choosing to think in that moment. Every time you catch yourself worrying, do not worry about it because it is actually a moment you are taking back your power. You can then take your focus back to your current moment for conscious thinking instead of going down the rabbit hole. By mentally asking yourself throughout the day you train your mind to be self-aware. By continuously aligning your mind to conscious thinking you establish this new habit of thinking pattern. It won’t take long before it becomes a habit of yours to think consciously.

You can end worries once and for all and start being the designer of your life. You don’t run your thoughts by “default”, you think deliberately and consciously. By doing so, you create a happier and more fulfilling life.

 

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